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Accounting & Finance

Accounting and Finance professionals support our growing economy by preparing and examining financial statements, budgets, taxes and more. But just like any career, accounting may be a better fit for some personalities than others.

A job in Accounting & Finance may be right for you if you:

  • Are a logical thinker
  • Have strong quantitative reasoning skills
  • Are detail oriented
  • Understand numbers
  • Know or have an interest in how a business runs
  • Are analytical
  • Value honesty

Types of Jobs

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals.

Accountant

Accounting Clerk

Auditor

Financial analyst

Financial Planning & Analysis

Controller

Treasury Analyst

Accountant

Prepares, analyzes, and maintains financial records. They perform a variety of tasks, including managing payroll, taxes, and other payments. There are many different types of accountants, from general accountants to tax accountants, each with different duties.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Accounting Clerk

Produces and maintains financial records for a company. They might enter financial information into computer software, check data for accuracy, or produce reports on the data. Also known as a bookkeeping clerk or auditing clerk, they work in almost all industries.
(Undergraduate)

Auditor

An Auditor’s duties are very similar to an accountant’s. Like an accountant, they prepare, analyze, and manage financial records. However, auditors more typically work for an accounting or payroll service, rather than working for one particular company. Typically, an auditor checks the work performed by a company’s accountant.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Financial analyst

A Financial Analyst evaluates businesses and projects to see if an entity is a good candidate to invest in. They might make recommendations to a particular bank, company, or to various investors about whether to invest in a particular company.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Financial Planning & Analysis

The FP&A manager is in charge of the company’s Profit and Loss Statement (P&L), and forecasts the “bottom line”: Net Income, which is literally the bottom line of any company’s or division’s P&L. If you work in FP&A, your job is to give the CFO a good idea of what will happen to the different line items of the P&L during the quarter, year, and next five years.
(Graduate)

Controller

A controller (sometimes called a “comptroller”) is responsible for accounting activities for a particular company. They would prepare financial statements and budgets, process data, and prepare taxes. The controller typically reports to the chief financial officer (CFO).
(Graduate) 

Treasury Analyst

Treasury deals with everything related to cash and cash flow. Treasury analysts, forecast how much cash a company needs in the future, and then ensures this amount of cash is available when it’s required. The Treasurer is responsible for balancing the cash position of all the company’s accounts and is the main contact for investment banks and investors.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

If accounting sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s undergraduate and graduate Accounting degree programs.

Human Resources

As new companies form and organizations expand operations, they will need human resources managers to oversee and administer their programs, and to ensure firms adhere to changing and complex employment laws.

As a Human Resource professional your responsibilities could include:

  • Interviewing and hiring employees
  • Developing personnel policies with top management
  • Managing employee benefits
  • Investigating and resolving grievances
  • Maintaining confidential records and personnel files
  • Coordinating equipment acquisition and IT access
  • Preparing new hire manuals and conducting orientation

A job in Human Resources might be right for you, if you are:

  • Excellent with people
  • Highly organized
  • Able to remain unbiased and objective
  • Trustworthy
  • Good at instructing, training, and mentoring
  • Naturally assertive
  • Work well as part of a team

TYPES OF JOBS

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals:

Human Resources Specialist

Human Resources Manager

Compensation Benefits Manager

Labor Relations Manager

Director of Industrial Relations

Human Resources Specialist

Human Resources Specialists recruit, screen, interview, and place workers. They often handle other human resources work, such as those related to employee relations, compensation and benefits, and training.
(Undergraduate)

Human Resources Manager

Plan, direct, and coordinate the administrative functions of an organization. Will also act as a link between an organization’s management and employees.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Compensation Benefits Manager

Compensation and Benefits managers are essential because they take care of employees' financial welfare. They are the voice of the management to employees and an advocate of employees' views to the management. They manage, evaluate, modify and recommend a company’s benefits and compensation packages so they meet legal requirements, are cost-effective, and meet employees' needs.
(Graduate)

Labor Relations Manager

A Labor Relations Manager facilitates a good working relationship between organizations and their employees. This individual must possess skills in data collection, negotiation, policy making, and be well versed with labor laws. Labor Relations Managers arbitrate and solve disputes, and interpret employer-worker contracts.
(Graduate)

Director of Industrial Relations

A director of industrial relations manages employment conditions and related issues. They may represent industrial, commercial, workers' unions, or the organization in industrial negotiations. Additional director of industrial relations duties may include staffing, administering disciplinary procedures, advising managers on organizational policy matters, providing current and prospective employees with information about company policies, and serving as a link between management and employees.
(Graduate)

If human resources sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s undergraduate and graduate Human Resources degree programs.

Project Management

For some, the black-and-white nature of project management work makes for a refreshing challenge. Delivering a project "on time and under budget" can provide great emotional rewards. The job offers the opportunity to lead, and new projects keep the work fresh. If you have an analytical mind, good people skills, and the willingness to rise or fall on the demonstrated success of your work, project management may be for you.

A job in Project Management could be right for you if you:

  • Work well in a team
  • Are a natural leader
  • Succeed under deadlines
  • Are goal oriented
  • Enjoy new projects
  • Have good people skills

Types of jobs

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals:

Project Coordinator

Project Scheduler

Assistant Project Manager

Project Manager

Senior Project Manager

Project Coordinator

A Project Coordinator is an entry-level position that offers exposure to the work done by project managers. It's usually an administrative position where you’ll generate and distribute the reports that keep the project management team, owners, company staff, and others informed of a project's progress. You also schedule meetings and assist the management team in any way possible.
(Undergraduate)

Project Scheduler

For larger projects, a project scheduler runs the software, inputting the information supplied by the management team and updating files as needed. This is a technical position that involves a great deal of computer work.
(Undergraduate)

Assistant Project Manager

Assistant Project Managers do not necessarily assist the project manager directly. Rather, they're usually assigned specific tasks to manage. They meet regularly with the Project Manager to report progress and problems.
(Undergraduate)

Project Manager

In this position, you may run a project yourself or lead a management team, delegating task management to assistants. Project Managers report to the "owner" of a project-whether that's a real estate developer, government agency, or your company's senior management. You oversee budget and schedule, and take responsibility for the project's proper completion.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Senior Project Manager

Many large organizations that tackle multiple projects at once,especially construction and engineering companies, employ a senior project manager. The senior project manager supervises a company's various project managers, coordinating the allocation of company resources, approving costs, and deciding which projects should take priority.
(Graduate)

If project management sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s undergraduate and graduate Project Management degree programs.

General Management

Are you attracted to today's high-tech business environment where leaders manage people, resources and operations on a global scale? Would you like to gain leadership skills designed to help you excel in the professional world? Can you picture yourself in a business setting, collaborating with a team of colleagues to solve complex business problems? If so, a Management position might be for you.

A job in Management may be right for you if you:

  • Enjoy leadership roles
  • Are a planner and problem solver
  • Like thinking about the big picture
  • Enjoy new challenges
  • Can negotiate
  • Work well in a team
  • Are comfortable taking risks

Career Fields

Management is a broad field, and typically students focus on an area or concentration that fits their interest. Some common concentrations include:

Business Analytics

Entrepreneurship

Finance

Global Supply Chain Management

Hospitality Management

Sales and Marketing

Business Analytics

As data floods the workplace, generated on an enormous scale by sources like smart phones and e-commerce, it creates new opportunities to use advanced tools and technology to process and manage huge datasets.  If you're interested in digging deep for information and analyzing big data to solve business problems, a specialization in Business Intelligence and Analytics Management could be right for you.

Entrepreneurship

Small businesses are a vital part of the American economy, driving innovation, growth and prosperity. They reflect the American dream and "can-do" spirit of entrepreneurship in which a good idea, strong business skills and enough hard work can build a substantial and fulfilling career, and leave a lasting legacy.

Finance

Finance is a dynamic and expansive area of the business world.  Pursue career fields in areas such as bank management, credit management, insurance analysis, and financial planning.

Global Supply Chain Management

In order to compete in today's fast-paced, global economy, companies must effectively streamline daily operations. Businesses rely on operations and supply chain management professionals to organize processes and procedures in order to function efficiently, remain competitive and achieve success.

Hospitality Management

Interested in launching your business career in the exciting field of hospitality management or tourism? Business travel and interest in domestic and foreign tourism drive demand for hospitality managers in hotels, event spaces, and food service companies.

Sales and Marketing

Marketing and selling products and services in today's global business environment requires the ability to keep pace with advancing technology platforms, new media and more.  Pursue a career in fields like advertising, public relations, sales, product management, digital marketing or social media.

Types of jobs

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals:

Management Analyst

Market Research Analyst

Financial Analyst

Sales and Marketing Manager

Social and Community Service Manager

Training and Development Specialist

General Manager

Budget Analyst

Management Analyst

Help businesses run better by studying their procedures and operations. Make recommendations for improvements, simplifications and cost savings.
(Undergraduate)

Market Research Analyst

Determine demand for certain products and services. Gather information on competitors, pricing and marketing to develop a plan for bringing a product or service to market.
(Undergraduate)

Financial Analyst

Evaluate financial plans of public or private companies.  Recommend improvements, track progress and uncover fraud.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Sales and Marketing Manager

Examine customer needs and purchasing habits, and direct efforts to gain and maintain good customer relationships. Test promotions and pricing, develop appropriate advertising and track success using customer relationship tools.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Social and Community Service Manager

Plan and coordinate programs that make communities stronger, safer or healthier. Oversee budgets and plan events and advertising. Work with community members and other social service individuals such as probation officers and social workers.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Training and Development Specialist

Plan and present training for employees. Develop courses to address specific training needs, track employee progress and provide recertification as necessary.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

General Manager

Direct and coordinate the operations of a small business or company department. Formulate policies, supervise daily operations and manage the use of materials and human resources. Use sound business practices to effectively manage available resources and make strategic decisions.
(Graduate)

Budget Analyst

Review organizational and department budgets and advise staff on how to allocate funds. Approve funding requests and help in the allocation and disbursement of money for various programs or to vendors.
(Undergraduate)

If business management sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s undergraduate and graduate Business Management degree programs.