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Engineering Technology

Simply put, engineers build things. Within this field, engineers can help design, build and improve tomorrow’s electronic products and systems, including renewable energy sources.

A job in Engineering Technology may be right for you if you:

  • Are curious about how things work
  • Have a good grasp of physics and math
  • Like to work on teams and communicate well
  • Find challenge in developing new applications for technology, such as personal communication devices, medical equipment, power sources or even the vehicles we drive
  • Enjoy applying hardware and software solutions to technical problems

Career Fields

Engineering Technology is a broad field, and typically students focus on an area or concentration that fits their interest. Some common concentrations include: Electronics Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Computer Engineering.

Electronics Engineers

Computer Engineers

Biomedical Hardware Engineers

Electronics Engineers

Electronic circuits are the building blocks of the technology revolution. Professionals who can build, test, program and troubleshoot electrical circuitry are a key resource for today’s tech-dependent businesses.

Computer Engineers

Create advanced electronics that can download music, play games, communicate, steer vehicles or do our banking.

Biomedical Hardware Engineers

Work with physicians, therapists, and other technicians in the design, construction, implementation, and maintenance of sophisticated healthcare equipment and lifesaving devices.

Types of jobs

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals:

Biomedical Engineer

Computer Systems Software Engineer

Electrical Engineer

Environmental Engineer

Industrial Engineer

Medical Equipment Technician

Sales Engineer

Biomedical Engineer

Design and build health systems and products such as artificial organs, instruments, medical information systems, medical devices and prosthetics. Computer, Automated Teller and Office Machine Technician — Install, maintain and fix electronic equipment. Travel to stores, offices and other locations to provide emergency repair services.
(Undergraduate)

Computer Systems Software Engineer

Working with hardware engineers, design and develop software systems that meet consumer needs. Develop installation and upgrade plans, test systems and incorporate customer feedback into upgrades.
(Undergraduate)

Electrical Engineer

Design, develop and test electrical equipment and components. Perform detailed calculations to establish standards and specifications. Research and implement improvements, and ensure compliance with codes and regulations.
(Undergraduate)

Environmental Engineer

Collaborate with environmental scientists, planners, hazardous waste technicians, engineers and other specialists, and experts in law and business to address environmental problems.
(Undergraduate)

Industrial Engineer

Combine production factors, including people, machines, materials, information and energy to make products efficiently. Test and improve production processes. Provide quality control and evaluate performance.
(Undergraduate)

Medical Equipment Technician

Test, adjust and repair equipment such as CAT scanners, MRI machines, patient monitoring devices and many others.
(Undergraduate)

Sales Engineer

Consult on technologies to businesses and governments.  Help determine how products can be customized to client needs. Develop proposals and negotiate pricing. Promote the sale of company products.
(Undergraduate)

If engineering sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s undergraduate engineering degree programs. We have associate’s degree programs, as well as bachelor’s degree programs in Electronics Engineering, Computer Engineering and Biomedical Engineering.

Information Security

Information security analysts will be needed to create innovative solutions to prevent hackers from stealing critical information or causing problems for computer networks.

Some professional responsibilities of cyber security professionals include:

  • Encrypting data transmissions and erecting firewalls to conceal confidential information
  • Monitoring use of files and regulating access to safeguard data
  • Setting and modifying access permissions to incorporate new software, correct errors, or change access status
  • Training users and promoting security awareness
  • Performing risk assessments

A job in Security might be right for you if you are:

  • Collaborative and cooperative
  • Logical, dependable, and calm
  • Analytical and detail oriented
  • An innovative problem solver

Types of jobs

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals:

Computer Forensic Investigator

Disaster Recovery Analyst

Information Systems Security Specialist

Computer Forensic Investigator

Recover, analyze and report on data found in computers for the purposes of investigations and trials. Determine how systems are hacked and recover data that has been encrypted or erased.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Disaster Recovery Analyst

Perform risk analysis for business functions to identify vulnerability. Ensure data and networks are recoverable; design and implement disaster recovery procedures; perform and analyze disaster simulations to promptly restore servers and systems.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Information Systems Security Specialist

Develop, implement and maintain security procedures, standards and policies. Help organizations prepare for, react to and recover from security threats. Also supervise and audit practices used to maintain proper security.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

If information security sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s undergraduate and graduate Cyber Security degree programs.  Our undergraduate program for Cyber Security is an area of focus within our Computer Information Systems degree program.

Networking & Communications

Professionals within the Networking & Communications segment are expected to design, implement, secure and manage business networks.

Career Fields

Here are a few of the current careers you could pursue within this field:

Data Communications Analysts

Database Administrators

Network Security Specialist

Data Communications Analysts

Analyze problems with systems, including wide area networks, local area networks, internet and intranets. Determine and implement solutions using methods such as information engineering, mathematical and data modeling, and cost accounting.

Database Administrators

Determine ways to organize and store data. Ensure the performance of a system, add new users to a system, set up new databases and understand the platform on which the database runs.

Network Security Specialist

With the threat of hackers, cyber-criminals and online terrorists, network security specialists are in high demand in both military and civilian occupations.

A job in Networking might be right for you if you:

  • Enjoy building things or taking them apart to see how they work
  • Are logical in your approach to tackling projects or tasks
  • Would rather build technologies instead of using them at a desk

Types of jobs

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals:

Network Systems or Data Communications Analyst

Telecommunications Specialist

Network or Computer Systems Administrator

Computer network architect

Network Systems or Data Communications Analyst

Assess networks to measure their performance and usability. Recommend upgrades or new systems. Supervise programmers and others working to create new software and hardware solutions.
(Undergraduate)

Telecommunications Specialist

Design voice and data systems, and oversee their installation in devices and at businesses. Monitor and provide support for system use.
(Undergraduate)

Network or Computer Systems Administrator

Install and support local and wide area networks, Internet connections and other networks. Maintain and upgrade hardware and software, and implement security measures.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Computer network architect

Design the internal networks all professionals within an organization use.
(Graduate)

If networking and communications sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s associate’sbachelor’s, and graduate Networking & Communications degree programs.

Web Design & Development

As web and other media technologies expand and transform, increasing demand for these skills is projected. And with millions of gamers worldwide, game graphics, programming and production jobs should continue to grow. Web Design and Development professionals create the web experiences that businesses and consumers enjoy and rely on.

A job in Web Design & Development might be right for you if you:

  • Like to build things from start to finish
  • Are interested in animation, video, and interactive design
  • Want to create leading online experiences
  • Have an eye for design

Career Fields

Web Design & Development is a broad field, and typically students focus on an area or concentration that fits their interest. Some common concentrations include Web & Graphic Design, and Web Development.

Web & Graphic Design

Web Development

Web & Graphic Design

This is the creative front end of a web experience that the public will see. Web & Graphic Designers tend to have a innate artistic side and creative abilities.

Web Development

Web Developers are usually working behind the scenes making sure that a website works the way it’s supposed to. Developers are often creative problem-solvers with strong logic skills.

Types of jobs

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals:

Graphic or Web Designer

Multimedia Artist & Animator

Multimedia Designer

Multimedia or Web Developer

Multimedia or Web Producer

Web Game Programmer

Web Programmer

Web Developer

Graphic or Web Designer

You will develop the look of printed and interactive materials, while considering user needs and company goals.
(Undergraduate)

Multimedia Artist & Animator

Creates images, animation, and special effects for games, websites, banner ads, and more.
(Undergraduate)

Multimedia Designer

Create video, Flash, and other kinds of multimedia user experiences.
(Undergraduate)

Multimedia or Web Developer

You will use assets created by other developers, to bring together a complete user experience.
(Undergraduate)

Multimedia or Web Producer

Producers and publishers will manage the business and organizational side of web and multimedia projects, including budgets, scheduling, and client interaction.
(Undergraduate)

Web Game Programmer

Works with animators, writers, and other professionals to program interactive games for online play.
(Undergraduate)

Web Programmer

Program websites, either on the front end, working with images and text, or on the back end, developing and programming the logic for applications and databases.
(Undergraduate)

Web Developer

Create websites for large companies, to help give them a public face.
(Graduate)

If web design and development sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s undergraduate Web Design and Development specialization, an area of focus within our bachelor’s of Multimedia Design and Development degree program.