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Healthcare Administration

Health Information

Constantly evolving regulations and technologies allow for lifelong learning and continued professional development. As healthcare advances, health information provides the patient data needed to successfully navigate the changes.

Health information professionals are responsible for the quality, integrity, and protection of a patient’s health information, which can include any or all of the following:

  • A history and physical exam
  • Lab results—blood tests, urine tests, etc.
  • Clinical information (nursing notes, physical therapy notes, and many others)
  • X-rays and other radiology procedures
  • And so much more

A career in health information may be right for you if you:

  • Want to work in health care, but not directly with patients
  • Have an aptitude for science
  • Enjoy management, law, and computers
  • Enjoy working with professionals such as: physicians, nurses, lawyers, administrators, executives
  • Want a career where you can choose to work: on your own, with others, or some of both
  • Have an aptitude and interest in working with computers and information systems

Types of jobs

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals:

Coding Specialist

Health Informatics Specialist

Health Information Technician

Clinical Documentation Specialist

Coding Specialist

Assign codes for different diagnoses and medical procedures to patient records; review billing and insurance claim files.
(Undergraduate)

Health Informatics Specialist

Develop systems that help doctors and other health professionals diagnose diseases and set treatment plans.
(Undergraduate)

Health Information Technician

Gather and maintain medical records. Provide reports of health information as requested by doctors, insurers and patients.
(Undergraduate)

Clinical Documentation Specialist

Analyzes patient records describing medical history, insurance claim and test results to enable medical staff to provide better health care for patients.
(Undergraduate)

If health information sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s health information associate’s degree program and bachelor’s degree program specialization.  Our health information management specialization is part of our Bachelor’s in Technical Management degree program.

Health Services

In a health services management career you must remain current on continually evolving healthcare systems, technological innovations, complex government regulations, and preventive care initiatives, and be prepared to handle professional responsibilities such as:

  • Business affairs and strategies such as billing and collection
  • Budget, equipment, and human resource planning
  • Organizing patient flow
  • Supervising and hiring nonmedical staff

A job in Health Services might be right for you if you:

  • Enjoy leadership roles
  • Are an excellent communicator
  • Are a solid planner and problem solver
  • Are highly organized
  • Have strong quantitative skills
  • Enjoy changes and new challenges
  • Are independent
  • Are flexible
  • Work well as part of a team

Types of jobs

These are some common career titles in this career field, a brief job description and an indication of the level of degrees (undergraduate or graduate) typically held by these professionals:

Healthcare Administrators

Health Policy Specialists

Medical Office Managers

Healthcare Administrators

Help with the day-to-day operations of hospitals, clinics, or assisted living facilities.  Their duties include hiring and scheduling staff, recommending workforce training, and responding to client comments, outside auditors and the media. Successful administrations are personable multitaskers with great organization skills.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Health Policy Specialists

Help the government, not-for-profit organizations and the healthcare industry weigh ethical and practical issues as they develop new healthcare policies and regulations. They may write reports or make presentations to groups of doctors or lawmakers, advising them on various courses of action. As a result, excellent communication and public speaking skills are required, as is broad regulatory knowledge.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

Medical Office Managers

Oversees the administrative operations of a healthcare office, including scheduling, payroll and other financial operations, clerical activities, facility maintenance and staff supervision. Responsibilities may include regular analysis of office productions, procedure updates and workflow improvements. Strong leadership and organizational skills are necessary to succeed in this position.
(Undergraduate or graduate)

If health services sounds like it might be a fit for you, explore DeVry University’s undergraduate and graduate Healthcare Administration degree programs.